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Firefox Sucks

 

I downloaded Firefox a few days ago, and for all the hype about its superiority, there's one element about it that absolutely sucks, from my web developer's point of view.

I have Opera, Internet Explorer, and Firefox. Some scripts that works just fine in Opera and Internet Explorer and conform to Javascript standards will not work as they should in Firefox. Fortunately for me, it doesn't drop my web site application to its knees, but it will cause the astute user to wonder why a particular thing isn't working... arghhh.

You can read more about the geek problem below, but here's a simple example. What follows are pictures of the same page inside Internet Explorer, Opera, and then Firefox - in that order. Notice how the page displayed in Firefox looks awkward and unbalanced.

Internet Explorer:

Opera:

Firefox:

See the difference in the table cell with the option button? The cell appears big and klunky, but these are pretty straight-ahead web pages... the HTML is clean. Two browsers get it right, and Firefox can't. That's just amateurish. I don't get why this much-hyped browser is hyped.

And here's my geek problem: I used the keyword "this" to pass a dynamic form variable to a function. In IE and Opera, no problem. But Firefox doesn't like it. Okay, I'll go explicit.

document.forms["form1"].u_versetext.value=document.forms["form1"].u_versetext.value.substring(0,2000);

That is flawless javascript. But Firefox tells me to use document.getElementById instead. Okay...

document.getElementById("u_versetext").value=document.getElementById("u_versetext").value.substring(0,2000);

Then I'm told: "document.getElementById("u_versetext") has no properties."

The hell it doesn't! It's a form element - all form elements have properties!

This is exactly why I have no ambition whatsoever to remain a developer. Good lord, I hope this painting thing flies because in the world of art there is no need for tech support.

ETC: I figured it out, although these anomalies are irritating and a waste of time.

The display problem: inside a cell, the paragraph tag

will expand the text area on both the top and the bottom, which balloons the area within the cell. IE and Opera automatically collapse that area to the text itself, which is why Firefox appeared different.

The javascript problem: the outlying function in Firefox apparently can't reach into a form and find the elements, so I have to pass it explicitly in the function call, like this:

functionname(document.formname.elementname)

Firefox's javascript engine can then find the element and adjust its properties.

I had to read a lot of web pages (thank god for Google) to figure these out. And I understand that not all browsers will render quite the same way, but such basics as the paragraph tag should not cause surprises. Firefox takes a high horse and says that this is exactly how the W3 standards declare the rendering. But both Opera and IE say otherwise and perhaps it's open to interpretation, but if one interpretation of the standard exists on the market already, then it's silly not to format by the market's interpretation.

 


by Brett Rogers, 1/8/2006 1:09:03 PM
Permalink


Comments

You're right. Firefox sucks.

 

 

Posted by GB, 3/23/2006 1:50:52 AM


FireFox and Opera will go the same way as Netscape Navigator because lessons weren't learned. In reality the standards are not set by Mozilla, but rather they are set by MICROSOFT, for Windows is Microsoft's operating system, and they are free to set any standards that they so choose.

Internet Explorer always tries to "do the right thing" when it loads a page. That is, it is "forgivable" of many coding errors that Mozilla browsers will not tolerate-because of Mozilla non-conformity. Additionslly, Microsoft handles tables and cells as Microsoft so chooses, not as "Mr. Mozilla" dictates.

Internet Explorer is part of the Microsoft Operating System, and if this causes the Mozilla freaks to gnash their teeth then I have a suggestion for them. Design your own operating system (and see how far you get).

I owe my livelihood to the genius of Microsoft, for if it hadn't been for the genius of Bill Gates (the Henry Ford of computing), we would still be using Comodores and TRS-80's.


 

 

Posted by John Peterson, 11/27/2006 12:34:10 PM


I totally agree with John Peterson (posted 11/27/2006). W3C doesn't set any standards that Microsoft is bound to adhere to, as Windows is Microsoft's creation and it can set any browser coding standards that it wishes to.

People never learn, for FireFox and Opera have followed (and are still following) down the path of Netscape Navigator, and they will soon be sharing a common grave.

The beauty of Internet Explorer is that it is amazingly forgiving of coding errors as well as variations from the "standards" set by W3C. If one wants to come out with an alternative browser to IE, well fine, but it MUST be as forgiving as IE or it is going to fall down HARD.

This reminds me of the battle between RCA and CBS in the early fifties, with CBS insisting that their color TV system, based on a spinning three-colored disk) was superior to RCA's all-electronic system that was compatible with black-and-white TV. Guess who won?

FireFox and opera belong in the trashcan of history, for they are CRAP!

 

 

Posted by Joseph Wong, 12/27/2006 10:50:16 PM


Unless you're designing an e-commerce site (where you're virtually forced to accomodate those twin toys), try to follow the rules of W3C as best you can and then pretend that Opera and FireFox don't exist. If it looks good in Internet Explorer then call it a day.

Microsoft won because it deserved to win.

 

 

Posted by William Frankmano, 1/22/2007 8:09:24 PM


Please, somebody tell me why someone would want to trade a fast-loading browser (Internet Explorer) for those slow-loaders (Opera and FireFox).

Obviously these geeks enjoy waiting, what seems like minutes, for a page's images to load, which undoubtedly explains why they had the hots for Netscape's Navigator.


 

 

Posted by Peter Schenberg, 1/22/2007 8:15:51 PM


Firefox just tries to follow strict standards. IE allows incredible sloppiness in coding and always has. Firefox seems to load everything faster than IE, in my experience. In regards to coding, just be sure you pay attention to letter case. Don't try to reference "u_versetext" when you actually spelled it "u_verseText" or whatever in your document.

It seems that most learn coding on IE with M$ lack of consistency or standards and it is quite true that extraordinary sloppiness is tolerated in IE. You don't have to close table cells, can mix and match letter case at will, etc, etc. Bah, Time to grow up and play in the big league.

Agreed, Firefox ain't perfect but it is a world better in regards to standards than the laggy, vulnerable, inconsistent piece of crap called IE.

 

 

Posted by Steve Salter, 8/9/2007 1:42:40 PM


I have a page which loads fine in IE, Opera and Navigator. In FF it is inconsistent and that is dreadful. Mostly it loads correctly but reload it and the navigation line is liable to crunch up. It happens in about 10% of the loads.

I find it hard to imagine how a browser can interpret the same code differently on different occasions.

I develop mostly with Opera as it has simple diagnostics that at least give me some insight into what is happening. The IE degugger is a joke.

Incidentally, if anyone can throw light on the FF inconsistency I shall be eternally grateful.

 

 

Posted by Bev Rowe (http://www.konstam.co.uk/Test%20site/reservations.htm), 10/27/2007 4:40:34 AM


I am currently working on a website that uses javascript. I hate how when I code something it will work in IE and not in FF. Tables in FF are also messed up, I tried running my site in Opera, and except for javascript erroring out, everything looks as it should. In conclusion... FF is a piece of crap that deserves to rot with Netscape.

 

 

Posted by DimaSoft, 3/12/2008 8:30:54 PM


Steve Salter allows incredible sloppiness in logic and always has. He believes that he should split hairs about what get capitalized in a markup language and is very jealous that a company knows how to make much more money than him because it instead capitalized [on] good ideas.

He also thinks that Microsoft, the author of Visual Studio, has a track record of "a lack of consistency or standards " and is so illogical that he will immediately discredit anything that they create.

IE = The Chosen One

W3C = Evil Council

 

 

Posted by seth, 7/21/2008 3:12:02 PM


For William Frankmano....Who are you? The Frankmano name was spelled wrong from day one when family came from Italy. Most corrected the spelling to Francomano. Very few remain with the K spelling. What is your family background if you don't mind me asking.

 

 

Posted by Don Frankmano (www.draculashouse.com), 9/28/2008 11:55:35 AM


I currently design a website in XHTML 1.0 Transitional DTD.....It has only a Table with a few cells which sizes are defined in CSS correctly according to the Standard. Validation Check and Browser Compatibility Check doesn't show any errors.

Now I run the site with IE6,7 and 8 plus Opera...everything works fine.....I open it with Firefox and the cells are messed up!!!!


After a few hours playing and testing out the CSS.....I came to the conclusion:

FIREFOX is peace of crap!!!

Cheers!

 

 

Posted by Joe Black, 5/16/2009 6:13:19 PM



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